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NASA Ball NASA
Procedural
Requirements
NPR 7900.3C
Effective Date: July 15, 2011
Expiration Date: July 15, 2016
COMPLIANCE IS MANDATORY
Printable Format (PDF)

(NASA Only)

Subject: Aircraft Operations Management Manual

Responsible Office: Aircraft Management Division


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Appendix C. Flight on Public Aircraft

C-1 Flying on Public Aircraft (Crewmembers and Qualified Non-Crewmembers)

Subject: Disclosure Statement for Crewmembers and Qualified Non-Crewmembers Flying on Board Government Aircraft Operated as Public Aircraft.
Reference: 41 C.F.R. 102-33, Management of Government Aircraft, section 102-33.165; (e)

Crewmembers and qualified non-crewmembers flying on board Government aircraft operated as either civil or public aircraft on the behalf of NASA shall have on file in Flight Operations a record of acknowledgement of the following disclosure statement:

Generally, an aircraft used exclusively for the U.S. Government may be considered a “public aircraft” as defined in Public Law 106-181, Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century, provided it is not a Government-owned aircraft transporting passengers or operating for commercial purposes. A public aircraft is not subject to many Federal Aviation Regulations, including requirements relating to aircraft certification, maintenance, and pilot certification. If an agency transports passengers on a Government-owned aircraft or uses that aircraft for commercial purposes, the agency must comply with all Federal Aviation Regulations applicable to civil aircraft. If you have any questions concerning whether a particular flight will be a public aircraft operation or a civil aircraft operation, you should contact the agency sponsor of that flight.

You have certain rights and benefits in the unlikely event you are injured or killed while working aboard a Government-owned or -operated aircraft. Federal employees and some private citizens are eligible for workers’ compensation benefits under the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (FECA). When FECA applies, it is the sole remedy. For more information about FECA and its coverage, consult with your agency’s benefits office or contact the Branch of Technical Assistance at the Department of Labor’s Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs at (202) 693-0044.

State or foreign laws may provide for product liability or “third party” causes of actions for personal injury or wrongful death. If you have questions about a particular case or believe you have a claim, you should consult with an attorney.

Some insurance policies may exclude coverage for injuries or death sustained while working or traveling aboard a Government or military aircraft or while within a combat area. You may wish to check your policy or consult with your insurance provider before your flight. The insurance available to Federal employees through the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance Program does not contain an exclusion of this type.

If you are the victim of an air disaster resulting from criminal activity, Victim and Witness Specialists from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and/or the local U.S. Attorney’s Office will keep you or your family informed about the status of the criminal investigation(s) and provide you or your family with information about rights and services, such as crisis intervention, counseling, and emotional support. State crime victim compensation may be able to cover crime-related expenses, such as medical costs, mental health counseling, funeral and burial costs, and lost wages or loss of support. The Office for Victims of Crime (an agency of the Department of Justice) and the U.S. Attorney’s Office are authorized by the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 to provide emergency financial assistance to State programs for the benefit of victims of terrorist acts or mass violence.

If you are a Federal employee. If you are injured or killed on the job during the performance of duty, including while traveling or working aboard a Government aircraft or other Government-owned or -operated conveyance for official Government business purposes, you and your family are eligible to collect workers’ compensation benefits under FECA. You and your family may not file a personal injury or wrongful death suit against the United States or its employees. However, you may have cause of action against potentially liable third parties.

You or your qualifying family member must normally also choose between FECA disability or death benefits, and those payable under your retirement system (either the Civil Service Retirement System or the Federal Employees Retirement System). You may choose the benefit that is more favorable to you.

If you are a private citizen not employed by the Federal Government. Even if the Federal Government does not regularly employ you, if you are rendering personal service to the Federal Government on a voluntary basis or for nominal pay, you may be defined as a Federal employee for purposes of FECA. If that is the case, you and your family are eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits under FECA, but may not collect in a personal injury or wrongful death lawsuit against the United States or its employees. You and your family may file suit against potentially liable third parties. Before you board a Government aircraft, you may wish to consult with the department or agency sponsoring the flight to clarify whether you are considered a Federal employee.

If the agency determines that you are not a “Federal employee,” you and your family will not be eligible to receive workmans’ compensation benefits under FECA. If you are onboard the aircraft for purposes of official Government business, you may be eligible for workman’s compensation benefits under State law. If an accident occurs within the United States or its territories, its airspace, or over the high seas, you and your family may claim against the United States under the Federal Tort Claims Act or Suits in Admiralty Act. If you are killed aboard a military aircraft, your family may be eligible to receive compensation under the Military Claims Act, or if you are an inhabitant of a foreign country, under the Foreign Claims Act.

NOTE: This disclosure statement is not all-inclusive. You should contact your agency’s personnel office or, if you are a private citizen, your agency sponsor or point of contact for further assistance.

C-2 Flying on Public Aircraft (Passengers)

Subject: Disclosure Statement for Passengers Flying on Board Government Aircraft Operated as Public Aircraft.

Passengers flying on board Government aircraft operated on the behalf of NASA will have been briefed on the following disclosure statement, and a single-sheet laminated copy of the following disclosure statement shall be made available at each passenger’s seat. Each passenger manifest shall be annotated that all passengers were briefed on their rights and benefits.

DISCLOSURE FOR PERSONS FLYING ABOARD FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT

(41 CFR 300.3, 301.10, and 301.70, Federal Travel Regulation (FTR), Section 301-70.909)

NOTE: The disclosure contained herein is not all-inclusive. You should contact your sponsoring agency for further assistance.

Generally, an aircraft used exclusively for the U.S. Government may be considered a “public aircraft” as defined in 49 U.S.C. 40102 and 40125, unless it is transporting passengers or operating for commercial purposes. A public aircraft is not subject to many Federal Aviation Regulations, including requirements relating to aircraft certification, maintenance, and pilot certification. If a U.S. Government agency transports passengers on a Government aircraft, that agency must comply with all Federal Aviation Regulations applicable to civil aircraft. If you have questions about the status of a particular flight, you should contact the agency sponsoring the flight.

You and your family have certain rights and benefits in the unlikely event you are injured or killed while riding aboard a Government aircraft. Federal employees and some private citizens are eligible for workers’ compensation benefits under the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (FECA). When FECA applies, it is the sole remedy. For more information about FECA and its coverage, consult with your agency’s benefits office or contact the Branch of Technical Assistance at the Department of Labor’s Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs at (202) 693-0044. (These rules also apply to travel on other Government-owned or -operated conveyances such as cars, vans, or buses.)

State or foreign laws may provide for product liability or “third party” causes of actions for personal injury or wrongful death. If you have questions about a particular case or believe you have a claim, you should consult with an attorney. Some insurance policies may exclude coverage for injuries or death sustained while traveling aboard a Government or military aircraft or while within a combat area. You may wish to check your policy or consult with your insurance provider before your flight. The insurance available to Federal employees through the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance Program does not contain an exclusion of this type.

If you are the victim of an air disaster resulting from criminal activity, Victim and Witness Specialists from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and/or the local U.S. Attorney’s Office will keep you or your family informed about the status of the criminal investigation(s) and provide you or your family with information about rights and services, such as crisis intervention, counseling and emotional support. State crime victim compensation may be able to cover crime-related expenses, such as medical costs, mental health counseling, funeral and burial costs, and lost wages or loss of support. The Office for Victims of Crime (an agency of the Department of Justice) is authorized by the Antiterrorism Act of 1996 to provide emergency financial assistance to State programs, as well as the U.S. Attorney’s Office, for the benefit of victims of terrorist acts or mass violence.

If you are a Federal employee:

1. If you are injured or killed on the job during the performance of duty--including while traveling aboard a Government aircraft or other Government-owned or -operated conveyance for business purposes, you and your family are eligible to collect workers’ compensation benefits under FECA. You and your family may not file a personal injury or wrongful death suit against the United States or its employees. However, you may have cause of action against potentially liable third parties.

2. You or your qualifying family member must normally also choose between FECA disability or death benefits, and those payable under your retirement system (either the Civil Service Retirement System or the Federal Employees Retirement System). You may choose the benefit that is more favorable to you.

If you are a private citizen not employed by the Federal Government:

1. Even if you are not regularly employed by the Federal Government, if you are rendering personal service to the Federal Government on a voluntary basis or for nominal pay, you may be defined as a Federal employee for purposes of FECA. If that is the case, you and your family are eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits under FECA, but may not collect in a personal injury or wrongful death lawsuit against the United States or its employees. You and your family may file suit against potentially liable third parties. Before you depart, you may wish to consult with the department or agency sponsoring the flight to clarify whether you are considered a Federal employee.

2. If there is a determination that you are not a Federal employee, you and your family will not be eligible to receive workman’s compensation benefits under FECA. If you are traveling for business purposes, you may be eligible for workman’s compensation benefits under State law. If the accident occurs within the United States, or its territories, its airspace, or over the high seas, you and your family may claim against the United States under the Federal Tort Claims Act or Suits in Admiralty Act. If you are killed aboard a military aircraft, your family may be eligible to receive compensation under the Military Claims Act or, if you are an inhabitant of a foreign country, under the Foreign Claims Act.



| TOC | Preface | Chapter1 | Chapter2 | Chapter3 | Chapter4 | Chapter5 | Chapter6 | Chapter7 | Chapter8 | Chapter9 | Chapter10 | Chapter11 | Chapter12 | Chapter13 | AppendixA | AppendixB | AppendixC | AppendixD | AppendixE | AppendixF | AppendixG | AppendixH | AppendixI | AppendixJ | AppendixK | ALL |
 
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